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Literacy Skills Test: Comprehension

Literacy Skills Test: Comprehension2018-10-27T12:49:35+00:00

The comprehension section of the QTS Literacy Skills Test can often be quite tricky. Having plenty of practise to brush up on your comprehension skills and to see what types of questions appear can really help on the day of your exam. Have a look at the comprehension revision notes and practise exercises below and get prepared to take your QTS Literacy Skills Test.

Section 1: Reading Task

The following text was a speech made by Earl Spencer at the funeral of his sister, Diana Princess of Wales, on September 6th, 1997:

  1. I stand before you today, the representative of a family in grief, in a country in mourning, before a world in shock.
  2.            We are all united, not only in our desire to pay our respects to Diana, but rather in our need to do so, because such was her extraordinary appeal that the tens of millions of people taking part in this service, all over the world, via television and radio, who never actually met her, feel that they too lost someone close to them in the early hours of Sunday morning. It is a more remarkable tribute to Diana then I can ever hope to offer to her today.
  3.            Diana was the very essence of compassion, of duty, of style, of beauty. All over the world she was the symbol of selfless humanity. A standard bearer for the rights of the truly downtrodden. A very British girl who transcended nationality. Someone with a natural nobility who was classless and who proved in the last year that she needed no royal title to continue to generate her particular brand of magic.
  4.            Today is our chance to say ‘thank you’ for the way you brightened our lives, even though God granted you but half a life. We will all feel cheated always that you were taken from us so young and yet we must learn to be grateful that you came at all.
  5.            Only now you are gone do we truly appreciate what we are without, and we want you to know that life without you is very, very difficult. We have all despaired for our loss over the past week and only the strength of the message you gave us through your years of giving has afforded us the strength to move forward.
  6.            There is a temptation to rush, to canonize your memory. There is no need to do so. You stand tall enough as a human being of unique qualities, and do not need to be seen as a saint. Indeed, to sanctify your memory would be to miss out on the very core of your being—your wonderfully mischievous sense of humour with a laugh that bent you double, your joy for life transmitted wherever you took your smile and the sparkle in those unforgettable eyes, your boundless energy which you could barely contain.
  7.            But your greatest gift was your intuition and it was a gift you used wisely. This is what under pinned all your other wonderful attributes. And if we look to analyse what it was about you that had such a wide appeal we find it in your instinctive feel for what was really important in all our lives.
  8.            Without your God-given sensitivity, we would be immersed in greater ignorance at the anguish of Aids and HIV sufferers, the plight of the homeless, the isolation of lepers, the random destruction of land mines.
  9.            Diana explained to me once that it was her innermost feelings of suffering that made it possible for her to connect with her constituency of the rejected. And here we come to another truth about her. For all the status, the glamour, the applause, Diana remained throughout a very insecure person at heart, almost childlike in her desire to do good for others so she could release herself from deep feelings of unworthiness of which her eating disorders were merely a symptom. The world sensed this part of her character and cherished her vulnerability.
  10. The last time I saw Diana was on July 1st, her birthday, in London, when typically she was not taking time to celebrate her special day with friends but was guest of honour at a fund-raising charity evening. She sparkled, of course.
  11. But I would rather cherish the days I spent with her in March when she came to visit me and my children at our home in South Africa. I am proud of the fact that, apart from when she was on public display meeting President Mandela, we managed to contrive to stop the ever-present paparazzi from getting a single picture of her. That meant a lot to her.
  12. These are days I will always treasure. It was as if we were transported back to our childhood when we spent such an enormous amount of time together as the two youngest in the family. Fundamentally she hadn’t changed at all from the big sister who mothered me as a baby, fought with me at school, who endured those long journeys between our parents’ home with me at weekends.
  13. It is a tribute to her level-headedness and strength that despite the most bizarre life after her childhood, she remained intact, true to herself.
  14. There is no doubt she was looking for a new direction in her life at this time. She talked endlessly of getting away from England, mainly because of the treatment that she received at the hands of the newspapers. I don’t think she ever understood why her genuinely good intentions were sneered at by the media, why there appeared to be a permanent quest on their behalf to bring her down. It is baffling. My own and only explanation is that genuine goodness is threatening to those at the opposite end of the moral spectrum.
  15. It is a point to remember that of all the ironies about Diana, perhaps the greatest was this: a girl given the name of the ancient goddess of hunting was, in the end, the most hunted person of the modern age.
  16. She would want us today to pledge ourselves to protecting her beloved boys, William and Harry, from a similar fate, and I do this here, Diana, on your behalf. We will not allow them to suffer the anguish that used regularly to drive you to tearful despair. And beyond that, on behalf of your mother and sisters, I pledge that we, your blood family, will do all we can to continue the imaginative and loving way in which you were steering these two exceptional young men so that their souls are not simply immersed by duty and tradition but can sing openly as you planned. We fully respect the heritage into which they have both been born and will always respect and encourage them in their royal role. But we, like you, recognise the need for them to experience as many different aspects of life as possible to arm them spiritually and emotionally for the years ahead. I know you would have expected nothing less from us. William and Harry, we all care desperately for you today. We are all chewed up with sadness at the loss of a woman who wasn’t even our mother. How great your suffering is we cannot even imagine.
  17. I would like to end by thanking God for the small mercies he has shown us at this dreadful time, for taking Diana at her most beautiful and radiant and when she had joy in her private life.
  18. Above all, we give thanks for the life of a woman I’m so proud to be able to call my sister the unique, the complex, the extraordinary and irreplaceable Diana whose beauty, both internal and external, will never be extinguished from our minds.

TASK:

Read the oration and answer the following comprehension questions.

  1. Who do you believe were the intended and main recipients of this speech? Tick one response:

a. The Royal Family.

b. The charities that benefitted from Diana’s patronage.

c. Ordinary people within the UK and the wider world

2. How, on the whole, is the audience made to feel? Tick one response.

a. Angry with the paparazzi.

b. Resentful of her former husband, HRH Prince Charles.

c. Sympathetic because she was kind but misunderstood.

 

3. Reread paragraph 1. In particular, look at the words, ‘I’ ‘you’ ‘family’ ‘country and ‘world.’ What is not being implied?

a. It is implied that the majority of the world’s population is in agreement with the Earl’s views.

b. The use of the 1st person singular and 2nd person plural pronoun implies a shared understanding between the speaker and listener.

c. The message starts with the individual speaker and expands to imply that this includes the family and the world.

 

4. Reread paragraph 2. Is the sentiment of this paragraph supported?

Yes or No

5. Reread paragraph 4. As princess of Wales, Diana had the title HRH. What is being implied?

a. Diana was no longer HRH because the title had been taken from her.

b. Diana did not need to use her title after her divorce?

c. Diana was pleased because she was no longer burdened with the title of HRH.

 

6. Earl Spencer’s main point in paragraph 5 is:

a. Diana was a person of great value and will be missed.

b. Diana wasn’t appreciated in life but will be missed in death

c. Diana left a clear message.

 

7. Reread paragraphs 6-9. tick 3 statements that are true:

a. Diana supported controversial causes.

b. Diana should be canonised and made a saint.

c. Diana was confident that she was valued by the people.

d. Diana could not relate with the ‘rejected’ in our society.

e. Diana could relate with the ‘rejected’ in our society.

f. Diana was intuitive and confident.

g. Diana was mischievous and confident

h. Diana was intuitive and vulnerable

i. Diana was vulnerable and confident.

j. Diana was mischievous and vulnerable.

 

8. Read paragraphs 10-14. There are 2 references to the newspapers. Is Diana’s perception of the paparazzi explicit? Tick the correct answer.

a. Yes. b. No.

 

9.  Look at the whole text. Does Diana change her perception of the paparazzi and contradict her earlier perception?

a. Yes. b. No.

 

10. From the remaining paragraphs tick the sentences that are correct.

a. The meaning of the name Diana is ‘hunted.’

b. Earl Spencer’s sisters are not blood relatives of Diana’s sons.

c. Diana’s recent personal life had been happy.

11. With reference to the whole text, which of the following statements are factual?.

a. “But your greatest gift was your intuition and it was a gift you used wisely.”

b. The last time I saw Diana was on July 1st, her birthday, in London…”

c. C “The world … cherished her vulnerability.”

12. With reference to the whole text, categorise which, if any, of the following statements are opinions and/or facts.

a. “Fundamentally she hadn’t changed at all from the big sister who mothered me as a baby, fought with me at school, who endured those long journeys between our parents’ home with me at weekends.”

b. “… despite the most bizarre life after her childhood, she remained intact, true to herself.

c. “…there appeared to be a permanent quest on their behalf to bring her down. It is baffling. My own and only explanation is that genuine goodness is threatening to those at the opposite end of the moral spectrum.

d. She would want us today to pledge ourselves to protecting her beloved boys, William and Harry, from a similar fate, and I do this here, Diana, on your behalf.

Are the previous statements A-D Fact of Opinion ?